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Jun 16 / Jonathan

Depressing to be Krugman

Well, maybe so, but this is an especially acute angle on the question. This is John Hinderaker writing at Power Line in August 2005. I forget how I got there.

61B15090-93BB-41A7-B35B-B4305AAA9C15.jpgIt must be depressing to be Paul Krugman. No matter how well the economy performs, Krugman’s bitter vendetta against the Bush administration requires him to hunt for the black lining in a sky full of silvery clouds. With the economy now booming, what can Krugman possibly have to complain about? In today’s column, titled That Hissing Sound, Krugman says there is a housing bubble, and it’s about to burst:

Meanwhile, the U.S. economy has become deeply dependent on the housing bubble. The economic recovery since 2001 has been disappointing in many ways, but it wouldn’t have happened at all without soaring spending on residential construction, plus a surge in consumer spending largely based on mortgage refinancing. Did I mention that the personal savings rate has fallen to zero?

Now we’re starting to hear a hissing sound, as the air begins to leak out of the bubble. And everyone — not just those who own Zoned Zone real estate — should be worried.

Well, if we believed anything Krugman writes, we’d be worried all the time. …

What, we worry? But wait, there’s more:

There are, of course, obvious differences between houses and stocks. Most people own only one house at a time, and transaction costs make it impractical to buy and sell houses the way you buy and sell stocks. Krugman thinks the fact that James Glassman doesn’t buy the bubble theory is evidence in its favor, but if you read Glassman’s article on the subject, you’ll see that he actually makes some of the same points that Krugman does. But he argues, persuasively in my view, that there is little reason to fear a catastrophic collapse in home prices.

Krugman will have to come up with something much better, I think, to cause many others to share his pessimism.

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