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Nov 21 / Jonathan

Citi and Goldman, sitting in a tree?

Felix Salmon.

Nothing’s unthinkable in this market, not even the idea that you can tie two rocks together and hope that they float.

More likely nationalization of Citi, this weekend, says Salmon.

Update: John Quiggin is pessimistic about Citi (and he’s not so sure about Switzerland).

End of the beginning?

The failure of Citigroup, which looks increasingly likely to happen in the near future, would mark the end of the beginning of the financial crisis. Until now, the prevailing view has been that the crisis and recession will pass in a year or so, after which things will go back, more or less, to the way they were, with a few less financial institutions, and a bit more regulation. A Citigroup failure would put paid to that idea.

Citi is not only too big to fail, it’s too big to rescue with any of the half-measures that have been tried so far. Only outright nationalization is feasible, and that will probably require joint action by a number of governments; Citigroup’s global operations are too big for the US to handle alone. After that, the kinds of tinkering discussed at the G20 last week will be irrelevant. It’s now unsurprising to read (on CNBC!) predictions that all US financial institutions will be nationalized within a year. That’s probably an overstatement: as long as the economy doesn’t really crash, there are plenty of small banks and credit unions that will survive, but few of the big names will be among them.

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